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Five Tasks That Will Keep Your Store Running Smoothly

Five Tasks That Will Keep Your Store Running Smoothly

Like any complex piece of software, Magento requires a bit of maintenance every now and again. As your store evolves and your business grows, new products and customer accounts are created and deleted, extensions and themes are installed or modified, and the general day-to-day operations of the store leave their mark.

Diligently maintaining your store will ensure that it remains secure, fast, and reliable as the years go by. In this article, I’m going to focus on five of the most common tasks that Magento store owners should add to their to-do lists.

Applying Security Patches

The Magento teams regularly release security patches that fix vulnerabilities in the software. The patches are released shortly after vulnerabilities are discovered by Magento’s developers or security professionals. If you don’t install patches soon after they are released, your store may be vulnerable to attacks by criminals and to data theft.

We advise Magento store owners to monitor the Magento Security Center, which publishes the details of patches as they are released. If you are unsure how to apply a patch, take a look at our Knowledge Library article How to patch your Magento store.

Find and Fix 404 Errors

404 is the HTTP response code that web servers send to browsers when they can’t find the requested resources. Over time, you will move or delete product and content pages from your Magento store. If you aren’t careful, links from other pages on your store will be broken, resulting in 404 errors when shoppers try to visit them.

404 errors create a poor user experience and too many can have a negative impact on a store’s standing in search results. It’s a good idea to regularly use a tool like Screaming Frog’s Broken Link Checker to find and fix any 404 errors on your store.

Log Rotation

Magento logs information about what happens on a store in the database, including customer activity, orders, visits, and more. That information can be very useful, but the logs grow over time and can take up a lot of space and degrade database performance.

Magento can automatically remove stale logs, but this capability is turned off by default. If you want Magento to automatically clean its logs, find out how to turn on log cleaning in our guide to Magento database maintenance.

Backing Up

If your Magento store is compromised by bad actors or damaged by human error, it is easy to restore it from a backup. But if you don’t back up, incidents of this sort can be catastrophic.

Magento 2 has a built-in backup system that you will find in the dashboard under System -> Tools -> Backups. You can choose to backup the whole store with “System Backup”, the database and media, or just the database.

It is a good idea to perform regular system backups and to move the resulting files off your Magento server to a safe location.

Flushing The Image Cache

Magento caches product images in a dedicated cache. The Catalog Image Cache can sometimes become very large over time as new products are added and old products are deleted. Flushing the cache (removing the images) can free a large amount of disk space.

You will find the cache controls in the Magento 2 admin menu under System -> Cache Management. At the bottom of the Cache Management page is a button that will flush the Catalog Image Cache.

If you choose to flush the Catalog Image Cache in this way, there is likely to be a performance impact as Magento regenerates the cache of existing product images. You may prefer to only remove older cached images with a command such as this:

 find /path/to/magento/media/catalog/product/cache/* -type f -mtime +180 -exec rm -f {} ; 


As always, make sure you understand exactly what this command does before running it.

With regular maintenance, your Magento store will remain fast, secure, and reliable as your eCommerce business grows. Don’t forget, our expert Magento support team is on-duty round-the-clock to answer your questions.

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Magento

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Magento Explained: Understanding The Magento Ecosystem

Magento Explained: Understanding The Magento Ecosystem

The Magento Ecosystem ExplainedThe Magento eCommerce application is at the center of a vibrant ecosystem of retailers, developers, designers, conferences, and Magento hosting providers. Like all ecosystems, Magento evolves, and it can be difficult for newcomers to the world of eCommerce to get to grips with its constituent parts and the role they play in building a successful eCommerce business.

In this article, we’re going to explain some of the terminology new eCommerce merchants need to understand before embarking on their journey with Magento.

First things first, what is Magento?

Magento is a powerful eCommerce application built on open source technology. It’s used by retailers ranging from solo entrepreneurs to big-name eCommerce merchants like Ford, Wrangler, Silent Night, Harvey Nichols, Paul Smith, and Christian Louboutin.

Magento was initially released in March 2008 and has since grown to incredible proportions. There have been two main iterations of the application (Magento 1 and Magento 2).

One of the main reasons why eCommerce developers love Magento is due to its customizability and ability to scale as a business grows. A huge number of plugins and extensions are available for store developers, and custom functionality can be included with help from a Magento developer.

Magento Commerce vs Magento Open Source

Image credit: Magento Commerce

The heart of the Magento ecosystem is an open source community of developers. The community is maintained by the Magento company. Magento Commerce is that company’s commercial offering, and includes support and additional features for enterprise retailers. This includes dedicated Magento account management.

Originally released in 2016, the self-hosted version of Magento Commerce was previously known as Magento Enterprise Edition. It has since grown to become a staple in the Magento community with bigger eCommerce businesses looking for more functionality looking for greater complexity and with a larger global presence.

If you’re a larger eCommerce business, Magento Commerce is likely the best option for your business.

Magento Open Source Comparison

Magento Open Source is a free version of Magento that includes many of the same features as Magento Commerce. Until recently, Magento Open Source was known as Magento Community Edition.

Magento commerce was originally released in 2007 as a public beta. The full version was released in 2008. Because Magento Open Source is open source, developers are not locked into the software they are provided. It is possible to make changes to the application and incorporates other technologies as well. This means that developers can craft Magento Open Source into something specific to their needs. Something developers aren’t as free with when it comes to Magento Commerce.

There is an impressive base feature set with Magento Open Source, yet where it really shines is in the additional features offered through the countless extensions currently in circulation. At the time of writing, there are more than 10,000 extensions available in the Magento marketplace.

To use Magento Open Source, retailers can choose a Magento hosting provider, which will provide the servers, bandwidth, and support a retailer needs to build their store. This also allows for Magento store owners to focus on what’s important – their store – and leave background processes to someone else.

There are other differences between the Open Source and Commerce editions of Magento. Here a few more in more detail.

FeaturesOpensourceCommerce
Responsive eCommerce website
Promotions Engine / Product & Catalog Management
Checkout, Payment, Shipping & Order Management
Site management (admin)
ElasticSearch
Bluefoot CMS in 2.2
Magento Order Management
Content Staging & Preview
Magento Shipping
OOTB B2B Functionality (in v2.2)

Magento is a complete eCommerce solution, but retailers can add extra functionality by installing extensions created by third-party developers. Magento extensions extend or enhance Magento’s existing features. Hostdedi has created several Magento extensions, including the popular Turpentine extension for Varnish integration, and Alarmbell, a Magento security extension.

There are hundreds of Magento extensions, both free and premium. Magento users should take care to only install extensions from reputable developers or marketplaces. If in doubt, head to the official Magento Marketplace, which we’ll discuss in a moment.

Magento themes are similar to extensions, except themes focus on the design of a site rather than on adding new functionality. Every Magento store uses a theme, and just like extensions, there are free themes, paid premium themes, and custom themes developed for specific retailers.

Magento Marketplace and the Community

Magento Marketplace is an officially supported repository of both extensions and themes. Magento Marketplace thoroughly vets all extensions and themes it distributes, so you can be sure that everything you find on there is secure and useful.

Magento Marketplace isn’t the only trustworthy source of themes and extensions. Many reputable developers have their own sites and stores. However, if you’re unsure of the quality of a theme or extension, it’s good practice to check to see if it’s on the marketplace.

Finally, Magento hosting: every eCommerce store needs a hosting provider. The hosting provider takes care of the store’s connection to the internet, the server the Magento application and its database run on, and the support retailers need to provide a fast shopping experience to their users.

Hosting providers are of varying quality and Magento requires specific conditions to provide the best performance and reliability. Choosing a specialist Magento optimized hosting provider with great support is the best way to start your journey as an eCommerce retailer

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Integrating A WordPress Blog With Your Magento Store

Integrating A WordPress Blog With Your Magento Store

Integrating a WordPress Blog Into a Magento StorePublishing audience-attracting content on an eCommerce store can be difficult. Product descriptions are essential but they aren’t the sort of content that attracts a loyal readership or brings people back time and time again. The importance of SEO value in generating organic reach means that it’s time to start integrating a WordPress blog with your Magento store. Content publishing is the present and the future of eCommerce and online retail, especially if you’re looking to attract new customers and retain existing buyers.

While it’s perfectly possible to blog within Magento using add-ons like the Aheadworks Blog extension, there are advantages to integrating a platform that has been built with content publication in mind. It’s also possible to turn WordPress into an eCommerce store, but Magento offers levels of flexibility and functionality that are difficult to replicate on a platform designed for content management.

If a retailer wants to maximize both the effectiveness of their content publishing efforts and the efficiency of their sales process, an integration that makes use of both WordPress and Magento is the optimal solution.

The best approach to WordPress/Magento integration depends on which is your primary platform. A WordPress site owner who wants to use Magento for selling products needs a solution with a different focus than a Magento user who wants to integrate a WordPress blog with an existing store. I’m going to look at how both use cases can be satisfied.

There’s some crossover here, so I’d advise you to take a look at the full range of functionality offered by the extensions I’ll be highlighting and make a decision that suits your particular needs.

Adding a WordPress Blog to a Magento Store

The best way to add a WordPress blog to an existing Magento store is with Magento WordPress Integration from FishPig.

The extension helps maintain a consistent brand identity by using the Magento store’s theme for the WordPress blog without requiring any modification of files on either the WordPress installation or Magento. Users can log-in to their WordPress blog from within the Magento dashboard.

One of the most important reasons for choosing to use WordPress rather than a native Magento blogging solution is the huge amount of extensions available for WordPress. Handily, the WordPress Magento Integration extension supports many of the most popular WordPress plugins, including Yoast’s SEO plugin and Disqus comments.

Install WordPress

To begin, you’re going to need to download WordPress and extract it to the Magento root directory of your server. Once installed, the WordPress folder should be named “WordPress”, rename this to “wp”.

Note: If you’re doing this on a Hostdedi account, get in touch with the Hostdedi team and we’ll help you to manage this stage.

To check if it worked, type in your web address followed by “/wp/”. For example, http://www.mystore.com/wp/. This should take you to the WordPress installation page, which you should follow in standard WordPress fashion to get your blog set up.

When asked for database information, you have two options. You can either create a new WordPress specific database for storing your blog data, or you can link to your Magento database.

It is perfectly fine to use your existing Magento database due to WordPress and Magento data being separated by different tables. If you’re unsure about where to find your database, you can search MagentoRoot/app/etc/local.xml and find the information there.

At this point, the two applications have still not been linked. You are running a WordPress install and a Magento install at the same time.

WordPress Integration for Magento

Download Fishpig WordPress Integration.

Fishpig is 100% free and can be downloaded using the link above. You can install the module like any Magento module by using the Magento Connect Manager. Just make sure that you’ve disabled the Magento Cache and Compiler while you’re setting everything up. If you don’t errors will pop up!

Now that you’ve installed the module, head to your Magento Admin and along the top find WordPress -> Settings. Here you’ll find two sections that are going to require configuration.

Magento Database and Integration Settings

First, head to the database section. If you decided to set up Magento and WordPress using the same database, then make sure that you select yes. Below this, you’re going to need to enter the WordPress prefix. For the purposes of this guide, that is “wp_”

Next, scroll down to the Integration section. This is where the meat of your WordPress Magento connection is coming from.

First, in order to make sure that everything looks nice from a user experience perspective, you’re going to want to make sure that you’re selected yes next to “Integrated theme”.

Next, you’re going to set up the URL structure for your blog. You don’t have to type the whole URL in, just the part that directs to the WordPress blog. We’ve gone with “blog” (there’s nothing quite like tradition) but you can opt for whatever you want. Using the example above, your WordPress blog will be located at “www.mystore.com/blog/”.

WordPress-Magento-Integration

Finally, you’re going to want to enter the path for to your actual WordPress install. If you’ve been following this guide to the letter, that should just be “wp”. Once you’ve done this, click “Save Config” and click out.

Configuring WordPress for Magento

In order to configure WordPress properly, you’re going to need to head to the general settings section. Here, you will be able to make changes to the URL structure of your WordPress blog and how it links to your Magento store.

The two most important sections are WordPress Address and Site Address. For WordPress address, you want to make sure that you have linked to the location of your WordPress install. This should probably remain as is. If you’re installed WordPress to the Magento root directory as directed above, this will be your website URL followed by /wp/.

Site Address should link to the URL structure you set up while enabling WordPress on Magento above. We’ve gone with the /blog/ directory, but it’s up to you how you set it up. Remember to include your Magento base URL before.

Once you’ve made sure that these things line up, hit “Save Changes” and you’re done. You now have a fully functional WordPress blog added to your Magento store. Congrats!

WordPress Blog in a Magento Store

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3 Key Takeaways from IRCE 2018

3 Key Takeaways from IRCE 2018

3 Takeaways from IRCE 2018

We’ve just returned from IRCE 2018. Between the marketplace and the sessions, there was a lot happening. eCommerce and marketing professionals from around the world were in attendance, and everyone seemed to have something to bring to the table.

However, throughout the show, we found that three things seemed to be present in almost all of the conversations going on.

Here are what we think were the three main takeaways from IRCE this year.

 

With huge marketplaces such as Amazon, speakers such as Seth Godin stated that “You will lose on price” if you try and compete there.

Instead, small companies should start to look at fringe groups that are likely to grow with time. Effectively building a business is about making change happen. It’s about taking something and increasing its value in the public consciousness.

This led Godin to prompt everyone to ask themselves two questions about their brand:

  • Who’s it for?
  • What’s it for?

Throughout IRCE, this theme found itself springing up time and time again.

The speech Institutionalize Innovation by Roe Macfarlane talked about how market segmentation required specific actions based on age, including the type of leader different groups are more inclined to follow.

Counter the Amazon Effect also talked about how it was important to innovate and inspire change in order to compete with the eCommerce giants of today. How did many people suggest this change and niche focus should come about? Personalization.

Compete against Amazon at IRCE 2018

Godin’s second standout statement during his keynote was also repeated by speakers throughout IRCE 2018. The importance is not in marketing to a mainstream audience, but in appealing to those who are already a friend to your brand. These connections should be nurtured in a way that creates a “tribe” that follows one thing: you.

This tribe should be nurtured through personalization techniques.

Personalization 2.0: Making the Move to Individualization by Brendan Witcher talked about the ultimate destination of personalization techniques: individualization, not segmentation. He also went over how to make use of big data to do this (without becoming ‘creepy’).

We also saw David Blades of Jenson USA talk about the importance of user generated content in boosting sales. The community wants the brand to be about them, and what better way to make it about them than by having them generate the content.

Magento and Machine Learning

With the first Magento Straight Talk during IRCE came conversations about machine learning and its place in eCommerce. For many businesses, the idea of machine learning has become something that is spoken about a lot but hasn’t shown enough value to be applied independently.

Anita Andrew’s talk inspired a different perspective, with stats on how effective machine learning has been for some huge brands. Target saw a 30% growth in revenue after applying machine learning techniques. Amazon saw a 55% increase in sales from personal recommendations, and USAA saw a 76% improvement in customer support contact and product offering fit.

Yet Anita did mention the issue with what she termed ‘dirty data’. Throughout the big data sessions, dirty data become a central point of interest. How do you take outliers and unpredictable variables and apply them to machine learning algorithms? Many of the IRCE speakers gave their own perspectives and approaches to cleaning for different purposes. Anita talked about cleaning data in order to boost product offerings. In Personalization 2.0, the focus was on how to clean data to truly individualize your brand. In the merchandising track, Carter Perez talked about how Machine learning could be used to improve product discovery.

Regardless of where you heard it, the message was clear: machine learning is the future and it’s here now.

Outside of the sessions, the marketplace was abuzz with activity. Many of those exhibiting at the show had something to offer that linked into the topics mentioned above.

Hostdedi met with several old, new, and future clients during the show and had a great time with all of them. We also went to go see the Cubs vs. Phillies game in Wrigleyville, with over 250 RSVPs to the rooftop event. We’ll leave you with the view we had and look forward to seeing you next time!

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Instant Purchases Bring One-Click Buying To Magento

Instant Purchases Bring One-Click Buying To Magento

instant-purchases-bring-one-click-buying-to-magentoJeff Bezos is the richest person who has ever lived, according to some sources. While that claim should be taken with a pinch of salt – Bill Gates was richer in real terms before he gave a big chunk of his wealth away – Bezos is certainly the richest person in the world today. That wealth is due to the enormous success of Amazon, and a big chunk of Amazon’s success is due to the stranglehold the company had over one-click purchases.

It would be silly to claim that one-click purchases were the most important factor in Amazon’s success, but we shouldn’t underestimate the difference in conversions and revenue between sites with one-click purchases and those that are required to make shoppers jump through hoops to buy. Experian have estimated that a single additional field on a check out form can cost an eCommerce company millions.

Once customers had become accustomed to one-click purchases, it was only a short hop to enhanced shopping experiences like Amazon’s Alexa, which can be used to make purchases by voice.

Last September, Amazon’s patent on one-click purchases expired. Any eCommerce store is free to implement one-click purchases, and Magento was fast off the blocks with the introduction of Instant Purchases.

Instant Purchases bring radically simplified checkouts to one of the most popular eCommerce platforms in the world, allowing tens of thousands of merchants to benefit from a user experience that was once the domain of a handful of eCommerce giants.

Magento Instant Purchases work like this: a shopper taps the “Instant Purchase” button on a store’s product page, confirms the order, and they’re done. A confirmation message appears and the shopper is free to carry on browsing.

To be able to use Instant Purchases, a shopper must be logged-in to their account, have selected a default billing and shipping method, and have a stored payment method.

A side benefit of Instant Purchases is that they encourage shoppers to create an account with all the necessary information, providing retailers with valuable data and increased opportunities for engagement.

Instant Purchases will also decrease cart abandonment rates. Carts are often abandoned before shoppers have completed the checkout process. With Instant Purchases, the decision is made on the spot. Shoppers are, of course, free to cancel any orders they make, but there’s a big difference between actively canceling an order that has already been made and deciding not to make the order in the first place.

Instant Purchases are worth exploration by any business that sells online. Shoppers have never enjoyed entering large amounts of information or plodding through multiple confirmation dialogues. Most want to be able to make a purchase within the context they made the decision to buy.

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Protecting Your Magento Store From eCommerce Fraud

Protecting Your Magento Store From eCommerce Fraud

Fraud has always been a problem for online retailers, but since the introduction of more secure credit cards in the last few years, much offline retail fraud has moved online. Magento retailers can’t afford to ignore the ever-present risk of fraud, whether it’s the dedicated efforts of criminals gangs with stolen identities or the less predictable casual fraudster who orders products with every intention of initiating a chargeback and keeping the goods.

Fraud prevention is both time and labor intensive, especially for larger eCommerce stores. It’s challenging to check every one of thousands of orders for fraud. And, as I know from personal experience, it’s all too easy to generate false positives and lose a genuine sale.

Last year, I ordered some furniture from a well-known retailer and apparently triggered their internal fraud prevention system. The issue wasn’t handled well, and by the time my order had been freed from the dungeon of manual review, the products I wanted were out of stock.

It’s a hard balance to strike: too strict and false positives eat into profits, too lax and those profits go to fraudsters. eCommerce merchants don’t want to give shoppers a bad experience — no one likes being accused of fraud — but nor do they want to lose money.

Unfortunately, we aren’t yet at a point where fraud prevention can be entirely automated. There’s no replacement for an eCommerce retailer who intuitively knows when a transaction is likely to be false based on extensive knowledge of the customer base and their order patterns.

Although a manual review of Magento eCommerce sales is here to stay, automation can significantly reduce the work involved, green-lighting genuine purchases and blacklisting fraudulent purchases according to the Magento eCommerce retailer’s policies, and passing uncertain orders to a manual review team.

There are several excellent fraud prevention automation tools that integrate well with Magento.

Signifyd

Signifyd, which provides a Magento extension for Magento 1.X, is one of the leading lights in the field of eCommerce fraud prevention. Its platform carries out an extensive series of verification checks on every order, using a combination of machine learning and human analysis.

One of the most interesting features of Signifyd is how it stands by its decisions. When the service approves an order as genuine, it will refund you the lost revenue if it turns out to be fraudulent. That means Magento retailers don’t pay the cost of chargebacks.

The service isn’t free, so individual retailers should compare the cost of using Signifyd to the cost of fraud for their business and make the appropriate decision.

FraudLabs Pro Fraud Prevention

FraudLabs, which provides Magento integration for Magento 2.x, has been in the fraud prevention industry for more than a decade. The free extension is easy to setup, and once installed FraudLabs will run every order through a wide variety of checks including fraud analysis and scoring, IP Geolocation, email address validation, and a custom set of rules, among others.

Orders are categorized as “approved”, “rejected”, and “pending review”, reducing the amount of manual order validation required.

FraudLabs is free for up to 500 transactions, making it ideal for smaller eCommerce stores that want to dip a toe in automatic Magento fraud prevention.

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How To Hire A Freelance Magento Developer

How To Hire A Freelance Magento Developer

Magento provides everything you need to build an eCommerce store. With specialist Magento hosting and Magento’s ecosystem of extensions and themes, you can go a long way. But, every store is unique and the time may come when your store needs the attention of a developer.

Magento developers can build custom integrations, extensions, and themes for a store, but it can be tricky to hire a qualified developer if you don’t know what you’re looking for.

A basic knowledge of Magento fundamentals helps. Magento is a web application written largely in the PHP programming language with a good dose of JavaScript on the front-end. Data is stored either in a database or on the filesystem in the case of static assets like images.

You can expect a decent Magento developer to be able to write PHP and JavaScript code and to have a working knowledge of databases.

Understand What You Need First

Although a good developer will be happy to guide you towards a solution, it’s useful to have a clear idea what you’re looking for in the first place. Take the time to write a detailed explanation that you can give to a developer. You don’t have to go into any technical depth, but the more certain you are of what you need, the easier it will be for the developer to get started.

Have a Realistic Idea of How Much a Developer Costs

You can expect to pay anything from $40 to $150 per hour for a qualified developer in the US. You may pay less for excellent developers outside of the US, but programming is a skilled and in-demand profession: set your expectations accordingly or the work may not be done to the highest standards.

Finding a Developer

In order of best to worst, here are the methods I use to find great Magento developers:

  • Personal recommendations. Ask people you know and trust to recommend a Magento developer. Referrals are not always trustworthy, but, in my experience, the hit rate is a lot higher than with some of the other methods we’ll discuss.
  • Magento development agencies. Magento development agencies like Human Element do the hard work of vetting developers so that you don’t have to. You may pay an agency more than you’d pay a freelance developer, but you also bypass a lot of the hassle involved in finding and hiring someone who can be trusted to do great work.
  • Social media searches. LinkedIn is often a useful resource, as are Magento-focused Facebook groups.
  • Freelance websites. Freelance websites like UpWork and Elance can be used to find good developers, but I’d advise against going down this route unless you have failed to find a good candidate elsewhere.

Assessing a Developer

Magento developers range from barely competent to highly skilled. If you aren’t a developer yourself, it can be hard to work out which sort you’re dealing with.

  • Check out their portfolio. Many freelance developers will be happy to show you a portfolio of work that they have done for other clients. Look for work that is similar to your project.
  • Ask for references. Some great freelancers don’t bother with portfolios — they get work through recommendations and referrals — but they should be able to provide you with references of previous clients.
  • Look for Magento Certification. Magento Certification allows developers to prove that they have the necessary skills and knowledge to work with Magento eCommerce stores. Ask about Magento certifications, and then double-check using the Magento Certification Directory.

If you’re still not certain about the quality of a freelance Magento developer, I’d suggest giving them a smaller job before embarking on a long project.

Don’t try to get developers (or any freelance professional) to work for free, even as an assessment: good developers will walk away because they can get more than enough paid work. Instead, offer a small job at their hourly rate.

It’s important to find the right developer for your Magento project. The tips in this article will ensure that you get the best results in a reasonable timeframe.

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January 2018’s Best Magento, CMS, and Design/Development Content

January 2018’s Best Magento, CMS, and Design/Development Content

Now that we’re well into the New Year, let’s take a look at what’s been trending so far so we can stay on top of the game! Check out this month’s roundup and if you’re looking for the same great articles the rest of the year, follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+. Enjoy and…

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Optimizing Your WooCommerce And Magento Product Pages

Optimizing Your WooCommerce And Magento Product Pages

What’s the most important part of your Magento or WooCommerce eCommerce store? For my money, nothing is more important than product pages and the content on them. Product pages sell, and everything else on an eCommerce store except the cart is there to get people to the right product pages.

I’ve never done the experiment, but I think no one would argue that it would be possible to build a pair of identical eCommerce stores with identical products and make one much more successful than the other.

How? By building incredible product pages.

Too many eCommerce merchants take a “good enough” approach to their product pages, pulling copy and images from their suppliers without even checking to make sure the formatting is right. If you have thousands of products, automating product pages is understandable, but it’s a missed opportunity. If you want your product pages to sell, take the time to make them compelling.

What does an effective eCommerce product page look like?

Title

With most eCommerce applications, the product title appears in the blue text of Google search results and in the most prominent position of social media posts. Just like a headline in an article, the title of a product page can make all the difference to whether a shopper clicks or not.

Make product page titles concise, descriptive, and easily understood.

  • Concise means short and sweet: don’t try to cram the full product description into the title.
  • Descriptive means that the title conveys the essence of the product accurately: don’t use empty meaningless “creative” descriptions.
  • Easily understood means written in good English (or the appropriate language for your market). Don’t use stock numbers or technical product descriptions in the title.

Put on your SEO hat and include relevant keywords, but don’t go overboard.

Images / Video

Words can’t convey the essence of a product as powerfully as images or videos. Provide a range of images that look good and that accurately represent the product. By all means, include creative art shots, but also include well-lit closeups of the product on its own.

Optimized Product Descriptions

Product descriptions are where every store can afford to be original and unique. The descriptions are a canvas on which each store can paint a word picture of the product that will appeal to their specific market segment.

Address product descriptions to the people who buy the products. As a writer, I keep the mantra “know your audience” in mind whenever I write. Each sentence is written to convey a message to that audience. Product descriptions are the same.

Once again, pay attention to search engine optimization and keywords.

Reviews And Testimonials

Social proof works. People are more likely to make a purchase when they know other people have had positive experiences.

Branding

Titles, images, descriptions, reviews — these are concrete things. Branding is more ephemeral and difficult to pin down. What feeling do you want your store to create in its users? Do you want shoppers to think you’re edgy and convention defying, technical and geeky, lighthearted and playful, serious and thoughtful?

The brand you want to cultivate should guide every decision you make about product pages, from the design to the copy and the images.

A/B Testing

Without testing, there’s no way to know whether changes you make to product pages are effective. Nothing I’ve said so far matters more than testing. When you are considering a change, use a split testing solution like Magento’s or Nelio AB Testing For WooCommerce to make sure it’s as effective as you hope.

Most important of all, take the time to look at your product pages and ask yourself these questions.

  • Would I be influenced to make a purchase by this page?
  • Does this page reflect the values and image of the brand I am trying to build?
  • Does this page have all the information a shopper needs to make an informed decision?

If the answer to any of these questions is no, then it’s time to give your product pages some attention.

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Hostdedi.net Meet Magento 2018 Recap

Hostdedi.net Meet Magento 2018 Recap

After an amazing week of Yoga and meditation in the holy city of Rishikesh right beside Ganga river, it’s time for a Meet Magento India recap!

The day started early setting up the booth with all our swag in the amazing venue Wagento choose for the event.

Brent and Vijay opened the first Meet Magento event in India talking about the local community and how important is India in the Magento ecosystem. Right after them, Mark Lenhard, SVP of Strategy & Growth outlined Magento’s roadmap and announced, among other things, the Magento certification program with new exams to come.

Right now, there are 31 Magento 2 Trained Solution Partners, 1092 Magento Certifications, 1004 Individual Certified Developers and 1025 Magento 2 Trained Individuals. The Indian community is growing extremely fast and quite a few events are planned for this year. The full presentation can be found here.

Right after PayPal keynote presented by Narsi Subramanian breakfast was served and networking started, with lots of selfies included (probably the best of the event). Magento 2 was the most discussed topic of the day and how to make it faster the question I heard the most.

Once the rooms were divided and ready, 3 simultaneous tracks fired up with lots of informative presentations. It was now my turn to present “Making your life easier with the CLI” outlining the new bin/Magento feature included in Magento 2. The audience was quite interested in the available command line tools available out of the box and the possibilities to extend it and add new functionality.

Right after me, David Manners explained what the Community Engineering is doing and how you can contribute to the core. Coming from times where contributing was hard, David explained his role and what OSS meant in the eyes of Magento. More about this topic can be found in Magento’s DevBlog.

After that, I moved to the Shalimar room to hear our own Jeries talk about Understanding Cloud Application Management and our new sister company, https://thermo.io

After a delicious of traditional Indian cuisine and some very warm interactions with the community, Vinai Kopp restarted the conversation with his presentation about Test Driven Development Magento Katas followed by Eugene Shakhsuvarov talking about Magento 2 technical guidelines.

After a long day with lots of new friends, the conference came to an end with Ben Marks remarks and Brent taking the largest selfie ever. I can’t confirm or deny Brent tried to make jokes without much success 😀

It was a long day, but the event didn’t end there. After some sleep, another Contribution day started early in the morning sponsored by Hostdedi where 25 pull requests were submitted to Magento 2 and some more to other Magento repos. Overall, it was an amazing event were we connected with a lot of happy customers who shared with us their success stories using Hostdedi as their hosting provider.

Thanks a lot to all the attendants and sponsors, see you again next year!

 

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